HNL News

December 06, 2022

Oncomine Myeloid Assay Coming Soon!

Myeloid malignancies are clonal diseases with multiple known genetic mutations. Genomic sequencing is advantageous in the classification and treatment of these diseases and can now be performed with a single test.

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November 18, 2022

RSV Surge Continues, Putting Infants at Risk

Cases of RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, are surging in the United States at rates far higher and earlier than expected. RSV-associated hospitalizations have more than doubled compared to last season¹. Download RSV| The Surge Continues, Putting Infants at Risk Infographic
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November 17, 2022

A Day in the Life of an HNL Lab Medicine Courier

Are you curious about what a day in the life of an HNL Lab Medicine Courier is like?   
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November 14, 2022

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Lung cancer is responsible for the highest number of cancer deaths with an estimated 130,180 deaths each year¹.

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November 10, 2022

World Diabetes Day

Over 34 million Americans have diabetes, there is a good chance that you or someone you know is living with diabetes¹. But what about people who don’t know?
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Careers

Phlebotomists FAQs

Phlebotomists - Common Questions in a Phlebotomy Career


  • What are a phlebotomist's roles and responsibilities?
    A phlebotomy technician, or phlebotomist, is an essential member of the clinical laboratory team who draws blood and collects specimens for lab testing and other purposes.
  • What skills do you need to be a phlebotomist?

    A phlebotomist needs a number of skills, including:

    • Coordination: It takes a steady hand and good eye coordination to draw blood while causing as little pain to the patient as possible.
    • Attention to detail: You must be certain everything is properly labeled and stored to avoid mixed, lost or contaminated samples.
    • Communication: Patients are often nervous about needles, so you will need to be able to explain the process in a way that calms them.
    • Endurance: Good phlebotomists need to be able to work with precision and accuracy even after spending hours on their feet.
  • Where can I work as a phlebotomist?

    Phlebotomists typically work in a variety of settings such as laboratory outpatient service centers, hospitals, medical clinics, nursing homes, and doctor’s offices.

  • What is involved in training to be a phlebotomist?
    Students will complete at least 40 hours of classroom training and 100 hours of clinical hours at an HNL Lab Medicine Patient Service Center (PSC) to fulfill ASCP Certification* examination requirements.

    In addition, 100 successful, unaided blood collections are required to sit for the ASCP Phlebotomy Technician exam. A typically scheduled session may have up to 100 or more hours of lecture time, including review sessions and a minimum of 100 hours of clinical experience.

    Most students surpass the minimum of 100 successful, unaided blood collection requirements and are well prepared to obtain a phlebotomy position after completion.

    *The ASCP certification cost of $135.00 will be covered by HNL Lab Medicine upon successful completion of the program and onboarding as an HNL Lab Medicine Phlebotomist.
     
  • Is it difficult to become a phlebotomist? 

    Being a phlebotomist is not difficult, but it requires training and practice. Phlebotomists will learn a lot through our training program and will improve as they gain more training and experience drawing blood. This job may be difficult for individuals who are sensitive to the sight of bodily fluids.

  • What phlebotomy test will I need to take for certification?  

    Upon successful completion of the HNL School of Phlebtomy program you must pass the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) Phlebotomy Technician Certification examination. (Separate fee to take examination) Note: Proof of High School graduation through graded transcripts sent directly to ASCP required.

  • What hours do phlebotomists usually work?

    Part-Time, 20 Hours Per Week, Day Shift, Monday-Sunday
    Full-time 40 hours per week, dayshift, Monday-Friday, with weekend rotation

  • What are the requirements for becoming a phlebotomist?

    Candidates will undergo a formal interview process with HNL Lab Medicine and be considered a per-diem temporary employee if accepted. Upon acceptance, the following will be required and processed following HNL Lab Medicine Human Resources and LVHN Employee Health policy.
    Non-submission invalidates acceptance for that session.

    • Medical Clearance/Vaccine Documentation
    • Fingerprint Clearance
    • Urine Drug Screen
    • Child Abuse Clearance
    • Background check
    • Proof of liability insurance
    • Proof of health insurance
    • Influenza vaccination (within the season)
    • COVID-19 vaccination

    Note: The presence of any controlled substance considered prohibitive after medical review of urine drug screen will prevent you from participating in the program. If any criminal background report is delayed and includes prohibitive offenses, you may not be able to complete the program.

  • What educational qualifications do you need to be a phlebotomist?

    In order to enroll, students must:

    • Must be 18 years of age

    • High School Diploma or GED documentation

    • Copy of unofficial graded transcript from high school or college

    Students will complete at least 40 hours of classroom training and 100 hours of clinical hours at an HNL Lab Medicine Patient Service Center (PSC) to fulfill ASCP Certification examination requirements. Which is the exam students will take upon completion to become certified that the program will prepare you for.

  • What skills will I have as a phlebotomist?

    Upon completion of the program, you'll be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the healthcare delivery system and medical terminology as it relates to the laboratory
    • Demonstrate knowledge of infection control and safety
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of body systems
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of age-specific or psycho-social considerations involved in the performance of phlebotomy procedures on various age groups of patients
    • Describe the legal and ethical implications of patient testing
    • Demonstrate understanding of the importance of specimen collection and specimen integrity in the delivery of patient care
    • Demonstrate knowledge of collection equipment and collection methods, various types of additives used in collection tubes, and special precautions necessary and substances that can interfere in clinical analysis of blood constituents
    • Follow standard operating procedures to collect specimens utilizing venipuncture or capillary methods
    • Demonstrate understanding of requisitioning, specimen transport, and specimen processing
    • Communicate (verbally and nonverbally) effectively and appropriately in the workplace
    • Define Quality Assurance as it relates to the practice of phlebotomy
    • Take the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) Phlebotomy Technician Certification examination. (Separate fee to take examination) Note: Proof of High School graduation through graded transcripts sent directly to ASCP required.
  • Is it worth becoming a phlebotomist?
  • Source Links - Indeed.com: Common questions about for a Phlebotomist - www.indeed.com/career/phlebotomist/faq

    Indeed.com: Common questions about for a Phlebotomist https://www.indeed.com/career/phlebotomist/faq